Thursday, January 17, 2013

My Experences

unedited: you may be wondering how i managed to edit my last blog post my mother was the one who edited it not me. i always have my mom edit everything i write because i canot edit it myself. a lot of people are mislead to believe that dysgraphia is a fine moter disorder witch is not always the case i do not have any fine moter problems but i still have dysgraphia when im writeing it doesnt occur to me to add puncuation it is often an after thought and i can look at something and only sometimes tell that it is wrong but i dont know how to fix it most times. i have had sevral intresting encounters that had to do with me haveing dysgraphia but the most intresting and one that made me really mad was with my english teacher last year. she had just learned that i had dysgraphia and i needed to take notes on my ipod to make things easer and she says sevral times that i need to just study more i thought that was as bad as it wold get her telling me i need to try harder when i had already tryed very hard and it diddent help one bit but what i learned later that in one of the phone calls between her and my mom she clamed that she could and i quote "break her (me) of dysgraphia" now i am makeing an assumption when i say that she had never heard of dysgraphia before now but even if she had she shouldent go mouthing off about stuff she evidently diddent know anything about because it is impossible to "break" someone of a learing disorder it is part of who they are it is just the way there brain works its not a bad thing. i dont enjoy not being able to do things that other kids can but ive gotten used to it and found things that help me as should anyone with a disorder should do find things that help you accomplish what you want to and never ever think you cant do something because of a disorder.


Edited: You may be wondering how I managed to edit my last blog post. My mother was the one who edited it, not me. I always have my mom edit everything I write because I cannot edit it myself. A lot of people are misled to believe that dysgraphia is a fine moter disorder, which is not always the case. I do not have any fine motor problems, but I still have dysgraphia. When i'm writing, it doesn't occur to me to add punctuation. It is often an after thought and I can look at something and only sometimes tell that it is wrong, but I don't know how to fix it most times. I have had several interesting encounters that had to do with me having dysgraphia, but the most interesting, and one that made me really mad, was with my English teacher last year. She had just learned that I had dysgraphia and I needed to take notes on my iPod to make things easier, and she says several times that I need to just study more. I thought that was as bad as it would get, her telling me I need to try harder, when I had already tried very hard and it didn't help one bit. But what I learned later was that in one of the phone calls between her and my mom, she claimed that she could, and I quote, "break her (me) of dysgraphia." Now I am making an assumption when I say that she had never heard of dysgraphia before now, but even if she had she shouldn't go mouthing off about stuff she evidently didn't know anything about because it is impossible to "break" someone of a learing disorder. It is part of who they are. It is just the way their brain works, it's not a bad thing. I don't enjoy not being able to do things that other kids can, but i've gotten used to it and found things that help me, as anyone with a disorder should do. Find things that help you accomplish what you want to, and never, ever think you can't do something because of a disorder.

2 comments:

  1. I am 35 now and have several severe learning disabilities. I am usually extremely good at masking them only because I have had a lot of time to learn how to cope. (My biggest issue is ADD and I have some obsessive compulsive tendencies; however, when you have flown to Europe and left the oven on, it's no longer unreasonable to check 5 or 6 times to make sure you've turned it off!)

    I am in a Speech Pathology program and my professor has recommended your blog for us to read. She is using it as an example of how dysgraphia has nothing to do with intelligence. Interestingly your spelling makes total sense to me. Though I do not struggle with spelling to the same degree that you do, my mind also processes words in a similar fashion and I run everything through spellcheck - even hand written letters. Your original posts are thus very clear to me.

    As for your Language teacher's comments, I'm really sorry about that. When I was in school, very few people knew that people could be both highly intelligent and learning disabled. I was admonished to "Try harder!" Now my motto is "Try hard and try different." I accept that it may take me longer to accomplish something that others may find easy, but I will find away that lets me be successful. I have learned to recognize when I am trying too hard at something and failing, that I need to choose another path.

    I think my learning struggles have made me a better person. It never fazes me when
    other people struggle with things. This allows me to be patient. I am also not intimidated by failure because I have spent my whole life tripping over my own feet then getting up and trying again. I like to think that means that I may be going slower than the others but that I will end up going further.

    Thanks so much for having the courage to write your blog. It sounds like you have a lot of really interesting things to talk about and an audience who really needs to hear your voice.

    The best of luck to you!

    - Jamie

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  2. I am frustrated for you...DS is homeschooled now because I grew tired of dealing with well-intentioned teachers with their high-minded attitude.

    What accommodations are you using at the moment and what have been the most helpful? Will you get to type the SATs? How does dysgraphia affect your math? How do you print your work at school?

    Thank-you, H

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